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Fuel for Thought

Customer Choice

By Greg Huggins
Posted Jun 20th 2020 8:33AM

  1. Why does your customer choose you? 
  2. Who is your competition?
  3. What sets you apart from your competition? 
  4. Where do you find great customers?
  5. When do you start looking for new customers?

  1. Why does your customer choose you? If you are always the lowest bid, you will probably always have work, but are you profitable? Having the lowest price can keep you busy, but would you rather be busy or successful? 
  2. Who is your competition? You have to know your competitor to win. Find areas where your competition is lacking and fill the void for the customer. Sometimes the customer doesn’t even realize there is a void until you show them that the same old way they have always done it is lacking. 
  3. What sets you apart from your competition? If you are doing what everyone else is doing, how are you different? Why do you deserve to earn more? Bring a value to the table. Drivers can be found just about everywhere, but business owners know that added value for the right customer, can be very profitable. Work hard, but work smart. Bring a new level of service to your customer(s). It will pay off in the long run.
  4. Where do you find great customers? Everywhere. Anywhere. In today’s society, there is always someone watching. Whatever you do, do your level best. People notice. Many times a chance load for a customer can become a lucrative client for many more loads. Even if you take a less than stellar load, always give astronomical service. 
  5. When do you start looking for new customers? Yesterday. Today. Now. Tomorrow. Always. Your next new customer can come from anywhere, at any time. Always be prepared. You could be impressing your next customer before you even know who they are. 

When you focus on your business and your customer, profits become clearer. Service sells. I can’t remember ever saying “that’s not my job” to a customer. My “job” is providing a service. Once I accept the load, my “job” is to complete it to the best of my ability. If that means a little extra work that I may or may not get compensated to do this time, there is a good chance that the next time I serve this customer I will reap the rewards based on past performance.


See you down the road,

Greg