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Ragman

Veteran Expediter
Retired Expediter
Offline
So are you and Ragman saying that a gas powered generator, chained up OUTSIDE the truck is the best way to power all the "luxury"? Foirget about inverters powered off the battery?
For the average guy. . . yeah.
If you are knowledgeable about batteries ,maybe not.
 

xiggi

Veteran Expediter
Owner/Operator
Offline
Just did my DOT physical, what a pain, but I passed. One step closer to the road. Again, thanks for the advice. An opinion or two here would be great.......Talking to a couple carriers, 60% of the load + 100% of the FSC, or a mileage rate WITH the FSC approx. $1.10 (variable of course). What do the veterans think would be better for a rookie, or the same either way?

Who says they are going to pay 1.10? I think personally for an owner of 60% is a little low.
 

Moot

Veteran Expediter
Owner/Operator
Offline
If I go to the 350 I would consider the "extra long" for added living space, still under 10K, but, would that extra length add CURB weight and negate the added load carrying?
Sure, everything is a compromise. Extra length will reduce your legal load capacity but increase your volume and living area. I ordered a Transit 350 tall, extended length. It is scheduled to go on the line sometime tomorrow. After I finish it, it should be able to legally handle 2800 lbs. and in most instances still accommodate 3 pallets leaving me a comfortable bed. Ask me again in about a month to see if dreaming becomes reality.

Any 3500 owners out there?
Yeah, me! I've owned two Chevy 3500 long wheelbase vans. If you took a poll of E.O. van owners, I believe most own and would recommend a 350/3500 (1ton) long version. The exception being Sprinter owners. Sprinters or at least the early ones, the 3500 models were DRW only.
 

xiggi

Veteran Expediter
Owner/Operator
Offline
Length is a biggie even if it did not add one lb of capacity I would choose it. After living in a van for a while you'll understand why we say that.
 

xiggi

Veteran Expediter
Owner/Operator
Offline
Did she follow that with, sorry didn't mean to hurt your feelings. :oops:
 

paullud

Veteran Expediter
Offline
Just did my DOT physical, what a pain, but I passed. One step closer to the road. Again, thanks for the advice. An opinion or two here would be great.......Talking to a couple carriers, 60% of the load + 100% of the FSC, or a mileage rate WITH the FSC approx. $1.10 (variable of course). What do the veterans think would be better for a rookie, or the same either way?

The clock will be ticking on that physical. I believe many companies want the physical to be within the last 30 days.
 

FlyingVan

Moderator
Staff member
Owner/Operator
Offline
I don't know if it is still that way, but Panther used to give physicals at the orientation no matter if you already had one.
 

Worn Out Manager

Veteran Expediter
Owner/Operator
US Air Force
Offline
Length is a biggie even if it did not add one lb of capacity I would choose it. After living in a van for a while you'll understand why we say that.

OK You & Moot have convinced me that I need to take a longer look at the 350 EXT
.
NOW - how do y'all feel about gas vs. diesel ??
 

Unclebob

Expert Expediter
Owner/Operator
Offline
I'm proud new owner of a Transit 350 extended with the 3.5 EcoBoost engine.

In this game flexibility is the most important aspect of selecting a vehicle. The longer length csrgo that you can haul or the heavier cargo will give you more possibilities of getting a load. IOW longer, taller and heavier, any of those three might be the difference between getting a load and sitting.
 

Windsor

Veteran Expediter
Offline
The transit diesel has already proven itself in Europe to be a reliable work hours for over 25 years now. Any problems it may have in the states will probably be EGR related problems. But I think for what we do it will show us over time to be the best choice. I think the twin turbo ecoboost will be a thirsty engine. And twin turbos? Overkill if u ask me for expediting. But what the hell do I know!
 
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Windsor

Veteran Expediter
Offline
There's a reason that ships, trains, semis, tanks, big generators, bulldozers, crains, farm equipment.............. ALWAYS have diesel engines in them. They tried putting gas engines in semis in the 70's and 80's and it was a disaster. Diesel engines have to be made more stout because of compression and have much better eternal components and have fewer moving parts. To have a diesel car in Europe with a million miles on it is a pretty normal thing, in the states it's rare to find a gas engine with a million miles. Think about it!
 

Windsor

Veteran Expediter
Offline
For my thoughts on the Ecoboost engine in the transit. The original Ecoboost engine only had one turbo but still didn't make much power. So what does ford do? They put a second turbo on it. Bad idea in my opinion for a daily driver gas powered work truck. Turbos create a tremendous amount of heat, heat that reeks havoc on a gas engine. That's why they're general only on high performance cars that aren't intended to be daily drivers AND ALSO diesel engines because diesel engines are specifically designed from the drawing board to be fitted with a turbocharger and a diesel can handle the excess heat better. With 2500lbs plus in a transit those twin turbos on the Ecoboost are going to be working overtime and creating a lot of heat that for sure is going to take a premature toll on that little gas powered v6. Ford even says "if your going to be constantly hauling a lot of weight then the the diesel is the best choice"
 
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Moot

Veteran Expediter
Owner/Operator
Offline
To have a diesel car in Europe with a million miles on it is a pretty normal thing, in the states it's rare to find a gas engine with a million miles. Think about it!
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2004 Chevrolet Express 3500 6.0. It ain't a million miles, but getting close.
 
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