UD 2600 or Hino 268 (used truck decision)

Which one will you buy?

  • UD 2600

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Hino 268

    Votes: 5 100.0%

  • Total voters
    5

atlwww

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I am deciding between those 2 trucks. I don't know anything about trucks, I would like to hear input on the pros and cons for each truck.

1. UD 2600, 2012, 190,000 miles, cruise control, power window. $35000.00
2. Hino 268, 2009, 140,000 miles, air brake and air seat, comes with 90 days, 25000 miles warranty. $35000.00

Are those fair price or overprice?

1. Which one is better value?
2. Maintenance cost.
3. Future resale value.
4. Fuel economy.

Your input is greatly appreciated.
 
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greasytshirt

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UD stopped selling new trucks in the US fairly recently. Parts and qualified mechanics are going to dry up soon afterward.

The 09 Hino only has a DPF, no scr aftertreatment system. That in itself makes it a winner.

You say you know nothing about trucks. What will you be using this truck for?
 

atlwww

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UD stopped selling new trucks in the US fairly recently. Parts and qualified mechanics are going to dry up soon afterward.

The 09 Hino only has a DPF, no scr aftertreatment system. That in itself makes it a winner.

You say you know nothing about trucks. What will you be using this truck for?

I do trade shows in different states, purchased a sprinter last year. It's too small for what we do now.

I went with rental route, it's too expensive, cost about $1000 per rental.

What' is a DPF?
 

greasytshirt

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I do trade shows in different states, purchased a sprinter last year. It's too small for what we do now.

I went with rental route, it's too expensive, cost about $1000 per rental.

What' is a DPF?

Diesel particulate filter. Everything past 2008 has one. They are $2000-$4000 and sometimes they just blow up.

You need an International 4300 with a DT466. You can buy a half decent one for under $10k. You're looking at a steep learning curve here, so start with a truck they made millions of and most diesel mechanics are familiar with.
 

atlwww

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Diesel particulate filter. Everything past 2008 has one. They are $2000-$4000 and sometimes they just blow up.

You need an International 4300 with a DT466. You can buy a half decent one for under $10k. You're looking at a steep learning curve here, so start with a truck they made millions of and most diesel mechanics are familiar with.

I am confused. Earlier you mention 09 Hino only has a DPF, no scr aftertreatment system. That's a plus over the UD trucks.

I am a little concerned about International truck because a friend of mine told me International has worse fuel economy and breaks down a lot (she has a 2 Isuzu & International) Is it something I should be concern about?

And through my rental with Enterprise, 90% of the time I get a International truck. I feel like it's noisy and slow compare to Isuzu FTR( I borrowed from my friend couple times). That's why I never consider International trucks.
 

greasytshirt

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I am confused. Earlier you mention 09 Hino only has a DPF, no scr aftertreatment system. That's a plus over the UD trucks.

I am a little concerned about International truck because a friend of mine told me International has worse fuel economy and breaks down a lot (she has a 2 Isuzu & International) Is it something I should be concern about?

And through my rental with Enterprise, 90% of the time I get a International truck. I feel like it's noisy and slow compare to Isuzu FTR( I borrowed from my friend couple times). That's why I never consider International trucks.
That year UD has both a DPF and SCR, so it's got two expensive systems vs the one. Winner=Hino.

Yes, they're noisy and not as fuel efficient, but plentiful. Parts, especially engine parts, are MUCH cheaper. There's aftermarket support and multiple parts suppliers, an advantage over the Japanese trucks.

One problem is age. The Int'l DT466 ended production in around 2007, replaced with the fundamentally flawed MAXXFORCE engines. Fixing these steaming piles puts the little guy out of business.

Id buy the nicest ~2000-2007 truck I can get my hands on.
 

atlwww

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That year UD has both a DPF and SCR, so it's got two expensive systems vs the one. Winner=Hino.

Yes, they're noisy and not as fuel efficient, but plentiful. Parts, especially engine parts, are MUCH cheaper. There's aftermarket support and multiple parts suppliers, an advantage over the Japanese trucks.

One problem is age. The Int'l DT466 ended production in around 2007, replaced with the fundamentally flawed MAXXFORCE engines. Fixing these steaming piles puts the little guy out of business.

Id buy the nicest ~2000-2007 truck I can get my hands on.

All right. Thank you!
 

atlwww

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That year UD has both a DPF and SCR, so it's got two expensive systems vs the one. Winner=Hino.

Yes, they're noisy and not as fuel efficient, but plentiful. Parts, especially engine parts, are MUCH cheaper. There's aftermarket support and multiple parts suppliers, an advantage over the Japanese trucks.

One problem is age. The Int'l DT466 ended production in around 2007, replaced with the fundamentally flawed MAXXFORCE engines. Fixing these steaming piles puts the little guy out of business.

Id buy the nicest ~2000-2007 truck I can get my hands on.

I just rented a 2015 Freightliner M2 106 medium truck today, love the way it drives, very quiet and smooth. I think it's a Cummin engine in it right? How is that compare to other trucks in the class?

I do about 20 trade shows in different states, most of them within 6-9 hours of driving. While fuel economy, maintenance cost, and repair cost is important. Last thing I want is truck breaking down on the way to shows, and if it breaks down I would want it to be fixed asap, so the service network is important.

As you mentioned the older International trucks are good enough, are they reliable enough for my use? My budget is $35000. Any other suggestions?

Thank you
 

Ragman

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As you mentioned the older International trucks are good enough, are they reliable enough for my use? My budget is $35000. Any other suggestions?

Thank you
The guy I drive for buys nothing but International trucks. They are tanks and very reliable. Getting repairs is no problem at all.

I strongly recommend them.
 

greasytshirt

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International also has a good dealer network.

Freightliner M2 with Cummins/Paccar engine is a good choice. Avoid ones with the CAT C7 engine.
 

atlwww

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That year UD has both a DPF and SCR, so it's got two expensive systems vs the one. Winner=Hino.

Yes, they're noisy and not as fuel efficient, but plentiful. Parts, especially engine parts, are MUCH cheaper. There's aftermarket support and multiple parts suppliers, an advantage over the Japanese trucks.

One problem is age. The Int'l DT466 ended production in around 2007, replaced with the fundamentally flawed MAXXFORCE engines. Fixing these steaming piles puts the little guy out of business.

Id buy the nicest ~2000-2007 truck I can get my hands on.

I found a International 2013 with DT466, is that one same as you mention above?
 

coalminer

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I found a International 2013 with DT466, is that one same as you mention above?
2013 will be the maxxforce, the company I used to run for had one and they spent more in repairs than what they paid for it over the course of 3 years.
 

tknight

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Dt466 not the best on mpg with auto usually around 7-8 stick shift would be better I've got no issues with mine which is way more than I can say for my m2 with Mbe 900

Power is ok just make sure you don't get the 190 hp 210-280 is best lots of 190s are old rental trucks . If you can get one with air suspension even better
 

atlwww

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Thank you all for you inputs, it's such a great community. Weighting in all the opinions above, UD is out of the water. I've been driving the Freightliner yesterday, I am not a fan of the steering wheel placement. But it does seem like it's my best bet right now.

I've done hours and hours of research. And I am still confuse. Not much user experience or comparison I can find online.

I hope I can get answers to my few questions below. Keep in mind that I will put about 20k highway miles on it annually. Each trip is about 400-800 miles. $35000 to spend.

1. Besides the emission issues. Is there any other serious issues with Hino? I read somewhere that 268 is a city delivery truck modified for expediters. And with my research for used truck. I see International and Freightliner has far more mileage trucks for sale than Hino. Does that mean Hino wont last as long as those two?

2. Is there any other known major issue on 2000-2007 International truck? hows the reliability compare to other truck? Heard horrible story

3. What if I throw GMC T7500 into the mix, I love theThoughts?
 
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greasytshirt

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1. Besides the emission issues. Is there any other serious issues with Hino? I read somewhere that 268 is a city delivery truck modified for expediters. And with my research for used truck. I see International and Freightliner has far more mileage trucks for sale than Hino. Does that mean Hino wont last as long as those two?

Hino only has 11% of the Class 5-6 market. The dealerships for them are also almost always dealers of more common brands, so most of the effort is put into training the mechanics for the other brands.
Most of the issues with these trucks stems from a lack of people qualified to work on them. When the truck has had all of the computer updates done and a few notable discrepancies addressed, they run for a long, long time. One guy on here has 750k on his, another member here has around 600k, and I regularly see them appear at the shop with 300k-700k and still running every day. The ones that blow up have either been horribly abused, have had idiots work on them, or do not get maintained much at all or have obvious problems ignored.


2. Is there any other known major issue on 2000-2007 International truck? hows the reliability compare to other truck? Heard horrible story

The DT466 engines use a high pressure oil pump to compound fuel pressure in the fuel injectors. This means that they do not like having their oil changed at extended intervals. And the age of these trucks means that a lot of the seals in the engines are getting older, so you start seeing symptoms of internal high pressure oil leaks. Things like being hard to start when cold. Or hot. Or engine oil going into the fuel tank. Or stalling. Fun stuff like that. Pinpointing the problem can be a hassle.

3. What if I throw GMC T7500 into the mix, I love theThoughts?
You mean an Isuzu FTR/FRR? Not bad. Fun to drive. A little tiresome on long trips. Eventually you will have engine oil go into the cooling system. Figuring out whether the oil cooler or head gasket is leaking is impossible without eliminating one or the other first. Engine parts are not cheap. When one of these starts going south and acting dumb, it at least does it slowly so you can recognize it before it scatters parts all over the interstate.


The point I'm trying to make is to realize none are perfect, all will eventually end up with a multi-thousand dollar repair bill, and there's no guarantee of anything. So you need to figure out who your local truck dealers are and find out from their customers if they are crooks or not. If you find a good shop, buy a truck from them or at least have them inspect whatever it is that you're planning on buying. If you're buying from a private party, make the sale contingent on it 'passing' an inspection by this shop. Some sort of plan like this can save you from making a terrible decision.
 
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greasytshirt

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Also, if your budget is $35000, don't buy a $35000 truck. You're soon going to learn why it was for sale and you're gonna need some of that money.
 
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atlwww

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Hino only has 11% of the Class 5-6 market. The dealerships for them are also almost always dealers of more common brands, so most of the effort is put into training the mechanics for the other brands.
Most of the issues with these trucks stems from a lack of people qualified to work on them. When the truck has had all of the computer updates done and a few notable discrepancies addressed, they run for a long, long time. One guy on here has 750k on his, another member here has around 600k, and I regularly see them appear at the shop with 300k-700k and still running every day. The ones that blow up have either been horribly abused, have had idiots work on them, or do not get maintained much at all or have obvious problems ignored.




The DT466 engines use a high pressure oil pump to compound fuel pressure in the fuel injectors. This means that they do not like having their oil changed at extended intervals. And the age of these trucks means that a lot of the seals in the engines are getting older, so you start seeing symptoms of internal high pressure oil leaks. Things like being hard to start when cold. Or hot. Or engine oil going into the fuel tank. Or stalling. Fun stuff like that. Pinpointing the problem can be a hassle.


You mean an Isuzu FTR/FRR? Not bad. Fun to drive. A little tiresome on long trips. Eventually you will have engine oil go into the cooling system. Figuring out whether the oil cooler or head gasket is leaking is impossible without eliminating one or the other first. Engine parts are not cheap. When one of these starts going south and acting dumb, it at least does it slowly so you can recognize it before it scatters parts all over the interstate.


The point I'm trying to make is to realize none are perfect, all will eventually end up with a multi-thousand dollar repair bill, and there's no guarantee of anything. So you need to figure out who your local truck dealers are and find out from their customers if they are crooks or not. If you find a good shop, buy a truck from them or at least have them inspect whatever it is that you're planning on buying. If you're buying from a private party, make the sale contingent on it 'passing' an inspection by this shop. Some sort of plan like this can save you from making a terrible decision.

Should I look for Authorized dealer to work on the truck? Or will small independent shop be good enough to fix it? If yes, there's few dealership around the city I live in, none of them has review beyond 3 stars on Google. :(

I am actually planning to buy either 09 Hino with 135k milese for $35k or 08 International with the DT466(not maxxxforce) engine 175k miles for $25k from this guy in Florida who offer 90 days or 25,000 miles Limited Engine Warranty through Truck Master. His truck was purchased from Penske Leasing. Spoke to him couple time on the phone, he was very helpful and sounds sincere. Should I also bring it to a shop and ask them to inspect the truck before I make the purchase? His company was established in 2010 and has pretty good review on Google.

Not looking to buy from private since my loan agreement doesn't permit that.
 

BigStickJr

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Have you considered looking for a carrier ?
When you look at purchase price, insurance, upkeep, etc you may be better off trying to hire a carrier.
Take your 4 last shows and figure your real cost if you owned a truck.
Then go to the home page here and call a few mid sized carriers and ask for a rate.
If you're in a good area you may find someone willing to work with you because of your volume.
Or look for a local outfit to work with.
You can experiment as you shop.
This idea gives you the chance to have a bigger or smaller truck tailored to each specific event.
 

BigStickJr

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Just read from top again and if $1000 per rental is too much then the carrier angle will be too much.
Unfortunately, truck ownership is more costly than the average person can begin to imagine.
A simple breakdown and a short tow can be $500 just for the tow.
To a shop that needs to overnite parts.
And charges $100-$150 per hour.
Sometimes can't get you in for 2-3 days.
You can't wait and end up with a rental anyway.
I'd try to negotiate a better rental deal and enjoy the benefits of non-ownership of a truck.
 
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