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Sitting in Passenger Seat and DOT

ihamner

Expert Expediter
Offline
We were recently told by a long time driver that I should not be sitting in the passenger seat when we go through scales because they consider that "on duty" and will pull our logs to be sure I'm not supposed to be in the sleeper. Often we are riding side by side to enjoy the time together and the scenery. Of course, when we take turns driving (like at night) one of us usually is in the sleeper but do I need to be "hiding" in the back when we go through a scale? What is your experience with this, ladies?

India Hamner
FedEx CC
D Unit
The reason so many people know the solution is that they created the problem!
 

greg334

Veteran Expediter
Offline
Well I am not one of the ladies but I hope this helps.....

The way it was explained to me was this;

If you are taking the sleeper exemption (which means in the sleeper exclusivly), that is considered sleeper time.

If you are in the drivers seat, that is considered driving/on duty.

If you are sitting in the passenger seat, that is considered on duty.

If you are doing maintaince, fueling or otherwise doing something on the truck, that is on duty.

If you are sitting in the lounge, BBQing behind the truck or wahsing your hair, that is off duty time.

Every DOT/Carrier Enforcment Officer (so far 6 of them) has said the same thing - so it must be true.
 

TeamCaffee

Administrator
Staff member
Owner/Operator
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If you are not on duty, do not be in the front seat going through a scale. We have never had any trouble and while Bob drove for USXpress I never left the front seat. I was just a passenger at that time and even when we would have a level 1 inspection I was never asked any questions. We have also had a HazMat inspection in Ohio and I needed to run into the rest area and was not been questioned. I still feel as if, you are considered a driver and sitting in the front seat going through a scale it is as if you are thumbing your nose at them. Better to be safe and go to bunk.
 

Tennesseahawk

Veteran Expediter
Offline
When my nephew and I were teaming, the passenger always jumped back to the bunk area. However, the few times we did stay in the passenger's seat, we weren't pulled over. I guess it depends on who you get.

"If I claim to be a wise man, it surely means that I don't know." - Kansas
 

catshavestaff

Seasoned Expediter
Offline
As a wet-behind-the-ears newbie, I don't get it. If I'm sitting in the passenger seat, I'm not driving. How could I possible be on duty or driving without a steering wheel in my hands? I'm reading a book, enjoying the scenery or listening/arguing to talk radio with my husband.

Somebody please 'splain it to me?;-)
 

TeamCaffee

Administrator
Staff member
Owner/Operator
Offline
The Federal Government has deemed in their infinite wisdom that you have to be in the sleeper getting your 10 hours of rest. If you are in the cab you are to log legally on duty not driving!
 

ihamner

Expert Expediter
Offline
I am soooooo thankful I asked this question! I never even thought about it until the driver mentioned it to us. Okay, if you pass us on the road near a weigh station and I'm not driving you can know I'll be hidin' in the sleeper. Ha!

India Hamner
FedEx CC
D Unit
The reason so many people know the solution is that they created the problem!
 

catshavestaff

Seasoned Expediter
Offline
Soooo, how is it that as team drivers we get to see the country if we're stuck in the sleeper berth? How much time do you actually get to spend in the passenger seat enjoying the view and chatting with your partner, spending time together?

(Somebody said no question was too silly, didn't they?)
 

Tennesseahawk

Veteran Expediter
Offline
You can't *wink* be in the passenger's seat *wink wink* if you are logging in the *wink* sleeper *wink wink wink* ;)

"If I claim to be a wise man, it surely means that I don't know." - Kansas
 

Coco

Seasoned Expediter
Offline
You can enjoy the freedom of the road but Big Brother is still watching.:(
 

Redbird Girl

Seasoned Expediter
Offline
DOT look at the fact that the front of the cab is your work space and the back is your home.Also if you are just sitting in a trk stop or R/A and DOT has had a bad day he can get you for sitting up front also,it is the work area.

Redbird Girl-LIVESTRONG-LIVE LONG:)
 

Crazynuff

Veteran Expediter
Offline
>
>The Federal Government has deemed in their infinite wisdom
>that you have to be in the sleeper getting your 10 hours of
>rest. If you are in the cab you are to log legally on duty
>not driving!
Actually , you are only required to be in the sleeper 8 hours and then take 2 hours off duty . The sleeper time must be 8 hours consecutive . Come out for a minute and according to regulation the sleeper time stops . If you are in the sleeper 6 hours and come out for 5 minutes that 6 hours doesn't count towards the 8 . It isn't just the scales you have to be concerned about . If a patroling officer sees someone in the passenger seat he can stop you and check your logs . You'd better be logged on duty not driving . It's not unusual for them to scan your logs from the patrol car so there better not be any discrepancy if you have your logs checked again soon .
 

Tennesseahawk

Veteran Expediter
Offline
Actually, sitting at the truckstop is off duty, unless you're doing paperwork or truck related duties. You can sit in the front seat.

"If I claim to be a wise man, it surely means that I don't know." - Kansas
 

catshavestaff

Seasoned Expediter
Offline
So, how does this work in practical terms? Remembering my noob status, could a team respond with a typical day that describes who is where? I know this may be kind of silly, but I'm just trying to get some kind of mental picture. I'm having a hard time explaining to my family how this works out.:D
 

TeamCaffee

Administrator
Staff member
Owner/Operator
Offline
Starting at 12:01 in the morning Bob will be driving and will stop between 2:00 and 2:30 in the morning and wake me. I will start driving about 3:00 a.m. and he will go to bed. I usually stop 3 to 4 times for at least 15 minutes to 1/2 hour. Bob will get up between 11:00 a.m. and keep me company until about 14:00 when we switch drivers. We usually try to fuel when we have a driver change. He will start driving and I will keep him company for a couple of hours and then make a light supper. I usually go to bed around 18:00 and stay there until my next shift. Bob will also stop 3 to 4 times during his shift for 15 minutes to 30 minutes. When are not running this hard and have the day off or not on a run I usually still get up pretty early and Bob will sleep in so we can stay close to our schedule. This seems to work well for us but I think every team has a different system that works well for them.
 

catshavestaff

Seasoned Expediter
Offline
Thank you, TeamCaffee, for sketching that out for me. Now that I see it in writing, I can make sense enough to describe it to my folks. Although I knew it would work, because so many teams do it, I couldn't explain it for lack of practical experience.

Chrissie
 

TeamCaffee

Administrator
Staff member
Owner/Operator
Offline
Believe me I never could explain it either and when we first started I still couldn't explain it. All I can say is in time the 24 hour day becomes a lot easier and you look forward everyday to being in a new place and seeing new things. No matter how you try to explain it to family or friends if they haven't done it they usually don't get it. Just remind them the you have the best job in the world!
 

jaminjim

Veteran Expediter
Offline
On duty time means all time from the time a driver begins to work or is required to be in readiness to work until the time the driver is relieved from work and all responsibility for performing work. On duty time shall include:

(1) All time at a plant, terminal, facility, or other property of a motor carrier or shipper, or on any public property, waiting to be dispatched, unless the driver has been relieved from duty by the motor carrier;

(2) All time inspecting, servicing, or conditioning any commercial motor vehicle at any time;

(3) All driving time as defined in the term driving time;

(4) All time, other than driving time, in or upon any commercial motor vehicle except time spent resting in a sleeper berth;

(5) All time loading or unloading a commercial motor vehicle, supervising, or assisting in the loading or unloading, attending a commercial motor vehicle being loaded or unloaded, remaining in readiness to operate the commercial motor vehicle, or in giving or receiving receipts for shipments loaded or unloaded;

(6) All time repairing, obtaining assistance, or remaining in attendance upon a disabled commercial motor vehicle;

(7) All time spent providing a breath sample or urine specimen, including travel time to and from the collection site, in order to comply with the random, reasonable suspicion, post-accident, or follow-up testing required by part 382 of this subchapter when directed by a motor carrier.

(8) Performing any other work in the capacity, employ, or service of a motor carrier; and

(9) Performing any compensated work for a person who is not a motor carrier.


If you are in the passenger seat you are on duty, not driving.
 

Ladytrucker1950

Seasoned Expediter
Offline
As a newbie, please tell me what line you were on in your log book. If you were on the sleeper line, you MUST be IN the sleeper. If you are in the passenger seat, you MUST be on duty, not driving. Please read your regulations book. Knowledge is power and much cheaper than a log violation.
 

Ladytrucker1950

Seasoned Expediter
Offline
Sorry Crazy, you are very wrong about the required sleeper berth time. You can be in the sleeper for 8 hours but you still owe them 2 more hours in the sleeper before the end of your 14 hours. You Must have a total of 10 hours in the sleeper, not 2 hours off duty to complete the 10.
 
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