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Nayone has their own authority pulling staright truck non cdl freight?

henboy1

Expert Expediter
Anyone with their own authority pulling loads for reefer/ dry freight in a box truck that is non cdl?

I am working on my authority and there are some loads on internet truckstop(under LTL reefer/dry).Besides ITS are there some other load boards for reefer or straight trucks.I am pulling a stepdeck and I am going into business with my brother who plans on buying a 6 wheeler that is non CDL.
 
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bluejaybee

Veteran Expediter
My first thought is what you would be able to tare with such a rig. To be non cdl, the truck will have to be 26000 or under. If it has a sleeper, that will cut your tare weight. Add a refer unit, refer fuel tank, refer insulated box, and you won't be able to tare much. I have no idea what your plans are, but from what I have seen, most refer loads are mostly heavy. Just something to think about.

As far as dry freight and non cdl trucks doing expedited loads, there are bunches of them. But vast majority are non refer and usually have a tare weight between 6000 to 10000. Usually depends on truck frame and sleeper size as to empty weight.
 
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henboy1

Expert Expediter
There must be a way around this in finding specific loads for this application must be online.For ex. ...my semi(just tractor) weighs 17.5kibs(this includes headache rack and generator).I am assuming a 24ft straight trucks' empty weight without sleeper is around 20k.This leaves around 6kibs (at most) of freight to be hauled.I am assuming 26k ibs is the grossed which includes the weight of the truck and it's freight.Please school me on this, I am a class A driver and don't have much expirience on this application.


Guys with your own authority, where are you finding your loads from?
 
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pjjjjj

Expert Expediter
If you're going to be doing mostly LTL, it's best to have the ability to haul as much weight as possible, ie the loads go for less, so you want to have many loads all at once.
If expedite, should be the same as any other C reefer unit. If you're going to be a 'new' carrier however, finding your own loads, you may have less opportunities just because you are an unknown in a time when freight is slim. If a broker/carrier had a choice between 2 generally same trucks to take a load for them, they're going to prefer the one that's a known entity or at least been in business awhile.
There are LTL loads that ask for reefer, tailgate, heated, that he might do ok with, but it may take awhile to get a swing going, ie people wanting/expecting you to be going and coming back to and from a certain location every certain day or week or whatever.. and that may preclude expedite possibilities to go with, unless you happen to get lucky now and then. Generally with LTL, more is definitely better.
 

P51bombay

Expert Expediter
Just help your brother get his CDL, piece of cake in a ST - a little wheel time, read the book, memorize the PT and he's good, don't have to go to school. I agree with the others, you won't get much payload on there. My T300 day cab, 24' box, with railgate comes in right about 18700 truck empty with jack, tie downs, twinkies and full tanks (100USG) leaving around 12500 payload - the M2 I used to drive was about the same minus the weight of the lift, around 16500, it was licensed at 25500 (though it was rated for 32000) and would take about 8500 on full tanks.
 

ATeam

Senior Member
Retired Expediter
Anyone with their own authority pulling loads for reefer/ dry freight in a box truck that is non cdl?
I'm curious to know what the CDL disadvantages are that make a CDL worth avoiding? Yes, there is some time and expense involved in getting a CDL, but do not the benefits outweigh the costs?
 

bluejaybee

Veteran Expediter
CDL or not, brother will have to go have an endorsement "For Hire" put on his license. And that requires a written test in most states. Might as well study air brakes also and go for a CDL. Or are we trying to get around something on our driving record which would prevent getting a CDL?
 

greg334

Veteran Expediter
IF you are going independent, don't even mess with a small truck, get the biggest thing that you can get your hands on that can haul the most weight. If your bother has to get a CDL, get it.

EVEN consider getting a tractor and a trailer and do even more work.
 

Jefferson3000

Expert Expediter
Henboy,

Whether you use Getloaded or ITS, you're going to run out of available weight before you can haul enough LTL freight to pay your way. I hope there is more to your plan than that.

Now, if you had a few local shippers as customers moving expedited loads outbound, you could charge a high enough rate that you could grab one of those reefer LTL loads on the way back and do well.

Not trying to pee on your parade, but from the way that question was worded, you and your friend might need some more time in research and planning before starting out on your own. It's dog eat dog right now.
 

greg334

Veteran Expediter
I am puzzled by the reefer thing, how much weight do you think you will have left with a truck with a reefer box and unit on it?
 

Jefferson3000

Expert Expediter
I am puzzled by the reefer thing, how much weight do you think you will have left with a truck with a reefer box and unit on it?
I've seen some smaller reefer units on those little 14 ft Isuzu NPRs that aren't so hefty. Of course, I still couldn't answer the question completely. Are you still running your FL70?
 

P51bombay

Expert Expediter
I've seen some smaller reefer units on those little 14 ft Isuzu NPRs that aren't so hefty. Of course, I still couldn't answer the question completely. Are you still running your FL70?

That's true, but I'll bet those are close to 10K empty and only go up to 14 or 16K don't they?
 

greg334

Veteran Expediter
Yep sure do

I am wondering if they can put more than a few thousand pounds of weight with an Under 26k truck that has a reefer box.
 

henboy1

Expert Expediter
Re: Nayone has their own authority pulling straight truck non cdl freight?

Are you guys are saying he should go for his class B CDL?.I guess a truck weighing 19k ibs (empty)means he only has 7kibs to play with.Does this also mean CDL straight trucks have a gross limit of 33kibs and not 26kibs like the non-cdl?
I see many loads on GL and ITS weighing 3kibs-5kibs and I thought it might be possible.When I got my CDL, 4 years ago it was much easier than it is now.They now want you to blind side and all kinds of stuff.It is not as easy as some may say.As I heard there are also more questions on the test than previously.
 

P51bombay

Expert Expediter
Re: Nayone has their own authority pulling straight truck non cdl freight?

Are you guys are saying he should go for his class B CDL?.I guess a truck weighing 19k ibs (empty)means he only has 7kibs to play with.Does this also mean CDL straight trucks have a gross limit of 33kibs and not 26kibs like the non-cdl?
I see many loads on GL and ITS weighing 3kibs-5kibs and I thought it might be possible.When I got my CDL, 4 years ago it was much easier than it is now.They now want you to blind side and all kinds of stuff.It is not as easy as some may say.As I heard there are also more questions on the test than previously.
It all depends on the truck, there are oodles (is that a word? :confused:) of non CDL box trucks out there, not so many with a refer. A dry box non CDL straight truck is going to have a payload somewhere around 8-9000lbs depending on the box and how the truck was built - a reasonable figure. I don't know what a refer weighs (and someone will) but I'm sure they ain't light, plus there may be a separate fuel tank for it, plus insulation in the box - it all adds weight and subtracts from your payload. Now a CDL dry van of the same size (assuming 24' here) will get you 12-14000lbs so substantially more. Getting a class B is much easier - blindsiding a Straight truck is a piece of cake, BUT that is not part of the test - its a simulated alley dock from a 45 degree angle - sight side, look in your states CDL book, it will have the requirements. All he needs is a bit of practice, do the written, medical and road test - probably cost about $300 out the door.
 

Jefferson3000

Expert Expediter
Re: Nayone has their own authority pulling straight truck non cdl freight?

Are you guys are saying he should go for his class B CDL?.I guess a truck weighing 19k ibs (empty)means he only has 7kibs to play with.Does this also mean CDL straight trucks have a gross limit of 33kibs and not 26kibs like the non-cdl?
I see many loads on GL and ITS weighing 3kibs-5kibs and I thought it might be possible.When I got my CDL, 4 years ago it was much easier than it is now.They now want you to blind side and all kinds of stuff.It is not as easy as some may say.As I heard there are also more questions on the test than previously.
*Yes, go for at least a CDL class B, even if the truck he uses in the beginning is under CDL. A CDL license on a vehicle requiring a CDL will be horrendous on his insurance for the first two years, especially running his own authority.

*Straight trucks are not limited to 33k GVW, but a 2 axle straight truck will top between 33-35K GVW. My three axle truck is rated at 46K. It could be rated as high as 52k technically, but some states 34K on a dual rear axle.

*Most loads listed on those boards are LTL rated. In other words, that 650 mile load will be offered to you for about $300. You can load multiple stops going the same way, but you'll run out of available weight before doing that on a non-CDL truck.

*CDL should require blind side backing. CDL requirements should be high, not easy. A commercial truck is a dangerous piece of metal when left in the wrong hands.

*I wish I could say this nicely, but right now you and your friend are clueless as to what you're getting into when becoming a carrier. I don't fault you for trying though. Do youselves a favor: Get licensed and go drive someone else's truck for awhile. If you make it driving for a fleet owner, then buy yourself a truck and lease yourself. You may even like that.
 

henboy1

Expert Expediter
Re: Nayone has their own authority pulling straight truck non cdl freight?

*Yes, go for at least a CDL class B, even if the truck he uses in the beginning is under CDL. A CDL license on a vehicle requiring a CDL will be horrendous on his insurance for the first two years, especially running his own authority.

*Straight trucks are not limited to 33k GVW, but a 2 axle straight truck will top between 33-35K GVW. My three axle truck is rated at 46K. It could be rated as high as 52k technically, but some states 34K on a dual rear axle.

*Most loads listed on those boards are LTL rated. In other words, that 650 mile load will be offered to you for about $300. You can load multiple stops going the same way, but you'll run out of available weight before doing that on a non-CDL truck.

*CDL should require blind side backing. CDL requirements should be high, not easy. A commercial truck is a dangerous piece of metal when left in the wrong hands.

*I wish I could say this nicely, but right now you and your friend are clueless as to what you're getting into when becoming a carrier. I don't fault you for trying though. Do youselves a favor: Get licensed and go drive someone else's truck for awhile. If you make it driving for a fleet owner, then buy yourself a truck and lease yourself. You may even like that.


Jeff you seem to be a veteran in your business and thank you for the info.But buddy I am not clueless at all.I know all about hauling loads for class A but I have no info on a class B.As I said many times, I HAVE LEASED MY TRUCK AND TRAILER TO LANDSTAR.I pull a stepdeck trailer and I find my own loads on their intranet.No one can get any closer to leasing to a carrier than that.I don't know why you mentioned leasing on with a carrier when that is what was stated in the original thread.I am just going for my authority and I was just inquiring for my brother who has a regualar C licence.
Thanks for all your responses.
 

ATeam

Senior Member
Retired Expediter
Re: Nayone has their own authority pulling straight truck non cdl freight?

Are you guys are saying he should go for his class B CDL?.
I am not saying that. I was asking what the reasoning might be for considering the non-CDL straight-truck option. Just trying to get a sense for the thinking behind the question. There are a number of business models in expediting. I was hoping to learn more about this one.
 

aukinet

Seasoned Expediter
Re: Nayone has their own authority pulling straight truck non cdl freight?

Henboy- I think the first thing you should do is call some insurance companys and find out if you can insure your proposed venture. I had to search long and hard and spend big money to get my son-in-law insured so he could operate under my authority( he was 23 at the time and had 5 yrs with a CDL A, no accidents, or tickets. Price went way down when he turned 25.
Also, having your own authority is NOT like leasing to someone. Be prepared to handle volumes of paperwork like you've never seen before. Miss an important deadline and have your authority suspended. Show up at an FMCSA audit without the right paperwork and get reamed out by the auditor(and possibly have your authority pulled). I took 2 large file boxes of paperwork with me on my first audit. I run 2 TTs under my own authority and I spend a minimum of 10hrs a week doing paperwork, billing, dispatching, bidding on loads, etc., etc., etc. I don't do any driving myself. Having your own authority makes you 100% responsible and accountable for EVERY aspect of your operation. Of course, you could hire someone to do all of your paperwork(for a fee) but you will still be responsible.
Then there is the issue of finding loads. If you bid on lanes you will probably get rejected because you don't have enough trucks. So you wil be doing the broker thing or using 3PLs like Landstar. Guess what. Now your doing what you did before. Paying a cut and being at the mercy of someone else. And in some cases waiting 6-8 weeks to get paid.
When there were 20 or 30 loads available for every truck out there you could be fairly successful. We haul steel and its been estimated that at the moment there are only 1 or 2 loads available per available truck in Ohio. This makes for some stiff competition and low rates. And the big guys get most of them. I've bought two more trailers so I can handle other freight. I'm not taking any pay myself so I can pay my guys. I have to kiss a** all the time get loads. We've been keeping the TTs spotlessly clean, and the guys wear clean uniforms and act extremely professional at all times(kiss a**) just to project a more professional image. This way we get requested sometimes. And we are trying to squeeze every bit of fuel out of these trucks. Tough with C15s.
The only times that LTL has done us any good is if we have room on a full truckload for it and we just look at it as a bonus. Very hard to make money doing LTL(for us anyway). We will also do them for fuel money occaisonally but only if its very little hassle.
If I have discouraged you a little, I've done what I intended, because I think you need to do some homework before you jump in. It WILL be tough in this economy.
I forgot to mention that it would be real nice to have 20-30K stashed somewhere to back you up in case of emergency. Or a Sugar-Mama.
 
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