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Hino turbo

spongebox1

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Anyone have a turbo go out on a hino 338 ? If so what was the rough cost and timeframe involved in the replacement?

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coalminer

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I can't comment on the cost for the turbo but I had to remove the turbo on my Hino to replace the orings behind the oil filter housing and total time for me to remove and reinstall the turbo was 3 hours. If I would have had air tools it would have been even less .
 

spongebox1

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I can't comment on the cost for the turbo but I had to remove the turbo on my Hino to replace the orings behind the oil filter housing and total time for me to remove and reinstall the turbo was 3 hours. If I would have had air tools it would have been even less .
Why did you need to replace the orings? Just curious, we have two hinos and would like to know the issues that these things have!

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coalminer

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Why did you need to replace the orings? Just curious, we have two hinos and would like to know the issues that these things have!

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I have been trying to figure out where the oil is leaking from and I had a small coolant leak coming from the oil cooler assembly. Fixed the coolant leak but the oil leak is still there, going to replace the oil pan gasket next, the dealer said it was the front main seal but I replaced it and it didn't stop the leak .
 

Turtle

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Trying to find an oil leak can be a real PITA, but one of the best methods it to first wash down the engine really well. Paint thinner works very well for that, since it won't cause any electrical problems. If you can connect a bottle full of paint thinner to an air hose for higher pressure, it's better, but simply in a hand-pump spray bottle will suffice. If you still cant find the leak after that, then there is dye you can put into the oil that will show you exactly where it's leaking under UV light.
 

coalminer

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Never thought about the dye, but this leak is really puzzling me, I have degreased everything thoroughly , run it up as high as the fast idle setting will go and watch for the leak but have not seen where it is. It's strange too when I change the oil it does not leak for 5000 or so miles....

The oil pan gasket looks pretty easy to change so hopefully that's it.

When I took the turbo off I replaced all of the gaskets for the oil and coolant lines that go to the turbo, but after looking at the old ones, really didn't need to do that, the oil ones are copper and not sure what the coolant ones are but the old ones looked as good as the new ones.
 

spongebox1

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Never thought about the dye, but this leak is really puzzling me, I have degreased everything thoroughly , run it up as high as the fast idle setting will go and watch for the leak but have not seen where it is. It's strange too when I change the oil it does not leak for 5000 or so miles....

The oil pan gasket looks pretty easy to change so hopefully that's it.

When I took the turbo off I replaced all of the gaskets for the oil and coolant lines that go to the turbo, but after looking at the old ones, really didn't need to do that, the oil ones are copper and not sure what the coolant ones are but the old ones looked as good as the new ones.
Where about is your leak on the engine? One of our hinos leaks after an oil change and it appears its coming from the turbo area, since the current driver is not mechanically inclined I can't be sure but I will be at the truck in the next few days so I will comment on my findings!

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spongebox1

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Trying to find an oil leak can be a real PITA, but one of the best methods it to first wash down the engine really well. Paint thinner works very well for that, since it won't cause any electrical problems. If you can connect a bottle full of paint thinner to an air hose for higher pressure, it's better, but simply in a hand-pump spray bottle will suffice. If you still cant find the leak after that, then there is dye you can put into the oil that will show you exactly where it's leaking under UV light.
Great advice

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BobWolf

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Turbo if its a Garret or can be replaced with one under $1,000.00 for the T/C if the trucks a few years old Id replace the oil lines.
Should cost between $ 2,000.00 if all goes well I don't see why it would cost more than $ 2,500.00.
Job is pretty strait forward as long as the turbo did not shatter and blow pieces through the engine.
Then all bets are off find a buyer.

Bob Wolf.
 

coalminer

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Where about is your leak on the engine? One of our hinos leaks after an oil change and it appears its coming from the turbo area, since the current driver is not mechanically inclined I can't be sure but I will be at the truck in the next few days so I will comment on my findings!

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Will update if I fix the leak, but next thing im going to replace is the oil pan gasket. Now after I replaced the front main seal, I was able to download a service manual for that engine and it shows a special tool to seat the front main seal, so maybe I was not able to get it installed correctly and it is leaking from it????

I tried to attach that service manual to this post, but it is 16mb, if you send me your email address, I will email it to you, lots of good info in there.
 

spongebox1

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Turbo if its a Garret or can be replaced with one under $1,000.00 for the T/C if the trucks a few years old Id replace the oil lines.
Should cost between $ 2,000.00 if all goes well I don't see why it would cost more than $ 2,500.00.
Job is pretty strait forward as long as the turbo did not shatter and blow pieces through the engine.
Then all bets are off find a buyer.

Bob Wolf.
Any suggestions on where to purchase the affordable turbo?

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greasytshirt

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Hi all, first post here. I was googling something when this thread caught my eye. I figured I'd sign up. I work on Hino trucks and I have some input.

How did the turbo fail? Usually, either the VNT controller is damaged, or enough radial play develops in the bearings that it can't control oil any more, or the compressor wheel starts rubbing the housing. It's serviced at the dealer as a complete unit, the VNT controller is not available separately on all models previous to '11. In '11-up, the VNT controller was improved. Nickel antiseize on the VNT rod pivots keeps it moving smoothly. Places where road salt is used can partially seize the linkage, causing VNT controller damage.

Someone mentioned oil cooler o-rings. Yeah, they leak. Gotta pull the turbo to remove the oil cooler. The oil cooler will leak both coolant and oil, oil from the o-rings and coolant past the factory rtv sealant. I can't recall when exactly, but the surface of the oil cooler housing got an update, the center of the flat surface was ball-milled to help retain the sealant. It's much better, but occasionally even the updated ones will start seeping. Right Stuff RTV, which comes in a tube for a caulk gun, seems to solve the problem permanently. When you go in to remove the turbo, don't remove the elbow that directs the exhaust downward. Take the four elbow-to-pipe nuts off, drop the first pipe clamp and loosen the second (under the truck), then take a 14mm socket just under the elbow and take the one bracket nut off. Two more support bolts under the turbo come out, then it's just coolant and oil pipes, and the four turbine housing flange nuts/bolts. Oh, and all the intake piping and stuff. The black sealing washers (aluminum with sealant coating) can be reused if the coating isn't scratched or flaking off. Use a torque wrench to reinstall the oil cooler housing. Never seen one warp, but I'd rather not be guilty. The actual oil cooler element itself is very robust and very rarely fail.
 

greasytshirt

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Will update if I fix the leak, but next thing im going to replace is the oil pan gasket. Now after I replaced the front main seal, I was able to download a service manual for that engine and it shows a special tool to seat the front main seal, so maybe I was not able to get it installed correctly and it is leaking from it????
Yes, there's a special tool. It would be very difficult to install the seal perfectly without it. It's an unusual seal design, and they don't usually leak unless there's another problem. Overfilling the crankcase oil is a common cause. Leaking injector return pipe under the valve cover, diluting the oil and causing the oil level to rise is another reason it'll leak. That return pipe never fails unless it was installed incorrectly. Unfortunately, it's often installed incorrectly. Human error installing the pipe, and the resulting fuel dilution, is probably the #1 reason for catastrophic failures.
 

spongebox1

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Hi all, first post here. I was googling something when this thread caught my eye. I figured I'd sign up. I work on Hino trucks and I have some input.

How did the turbo fail? Usually, either the VNT controller is damaged, or enough radial play develops in the bearings that it can't control oil any more, or the compressor wheel starts rubbing the housing. It's serviced at the dealer as a complete unit, the VNT controller is not available separately on all models previous to '11. In '11-up, the VNT controller was improved. Nickel antiseize on the VNT rod pivots keeps it moving smoothly. Places where road salt is used can partially seize the linkage, causing VNT controller damage.

Someone mentioned oil cooler o-rings. Yeah, they leak. Gotta pull the turbo to remove the oil cooler. The oil cooler will leak both coolant and oil, oil from the o-rings and coolant past the factory rtv sealant. I can't recall when exactly, but the surface of the oil cooler housing got an update, the center of the flat surface was ball-milled to help retain the sealant. It's much better, but occasionally even the updated ones will start seeping. Right Stuff RTV, which comes in a tube for a caulk gun, seems to solve the problem permanently. When you go in to remove the turbo, don't remove the elbow that directs the exhaust downward. Take the four elbow-to-pipe nuts off, drop the first pipe clamp and loosen the second (under the truck), then take a 14mm socket just under the elbow and take the one bracket nut off. Two more support bolts under the turbo come out, then it's just coolant and oil pipes, and the four turbine housing flange nuts/bolts. Oh, and all the intake piping and stuff. The black sealing washers (aluminum with sealant coating) can be reused if the coating isn't scratched or flaking off. Use a torque wrench to reinstall the oil cooler housing. Never seen one warp, but I'd rather not be guilty. The actual oil cooler element itself is very robust and very rarely fail.
I'm getting a lot of oil coming through the turbo, getting the whistle and loss of power, I have not personally looked at this hino but I am on my way to see it and will address it this weekend, we have two hinos and the one I just mentioned is puffing black smoke now as well! I found a turbo rebuilding company out of California but I'm Leary on shipping my turbo in for repair, I would love to maybe chat with you on the telephone about these two trucks because one is at 450k and the other at 380k and they are starting to get bothersome as I am more knowledgeable with the Mercedes, cat and cummins and these dam hinos are somewhat tricky!

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spongebox1

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The other hino is showing signs of oil either leaking into the turbo or around it causing the driver to believe its coming from the turbo, on the plus side this truck does not smoke, has great power no loss of fuel mileage so I'm hoping that once I look at it I can help determine what avenue to take.

If I am getting oil into the turbo or leaking close to it what should I be looking for? What are the immediate areas I need to address on this hino to narrow down the oil leak causes?
I will obviously inspect front seal, oil pan gasket etc...

Any suggestions or help is much appreciated!!!!!:)

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