Box truck or sprinter van

GS1988

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I’m brand new to this industry. I’m trying to decide on getting a box truck or sprinter van for OTR expediting. I’d prefer the van due to gas prices and lower start up costs but I have no problem going with a box truck. So my question is which one is more lucrative in general and if anyone with experience could provide a rough pay range for them. I’d appreciate any and all advice you guys could offer. Thanks
 

Case

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Wish i could help, just getting started myself. leaning towards a Van. Was told i should start driving with a company that already has a fleet, as far as pay range, it seems to be a "VERY WIDE" variations in pay. Currently have my on-"S Corp" so I'll be speaking with my CPA and find out the best way to proceed tax wise. unfortunately, there's no A-Z on how it should be done. If you should find a decent insurance carrier, let me know,
 

LDB

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Well, before spending money on a vehicle get your degree in expediting just like you would in refrigeration or paralegal or mechanics or any other career. The fortunate thing is you can get your degree at no cost, other than time. Read back at least 5 years in the General, Newbies and Recruiter forums here. Not every word, but read every single thread title. When one sounds at all interesting or educational for you then read every word of those threads. Yes, it will take you several weeks but how long does it take to get a paralegal certificate or master plumber certificate?

Once you've read back at least 5 years you won't be ready but you will be well enough educated to know what you don't know and be able to ask questions to really get there.

Vehicles. The more you can safely and legally haul the more potential jobs you'll get. While driving a 40' straight truck my smallest load was basically a shoe box weighing about 4-5 pounds containing some super heavy duty circuit breaker to get a Tyson chicken processing plant going again so 200 employees weren't standing around. I also had a similar sized box, about 12-14 pounds, with some sort of fastener for the line at Caterpillar that should have been making road graders and similar oversize equipment. That one cost about $10k per minute of down time.

Yeah, a van could have taken either one but there wasn't a van available so I got them. The van sat and waited when I got the 4 skids with 9k pounds of Duracells and who knows what all other loads. My smallest load ever, after I switched to a van, was a legal envelope with a roughly 150 page contract, no more than a pound or so. So you never know what you may get but the more you can carry the more chances of getting something.

I switched from the 40' truck to a Chevrolet 1 ton van the last 3 years on the road for the convenience. I could go eat anywhere I wanted and find a place to park. I could park in my driveway when I came home. If I were going out again it would be in a van with a higher roof, probably a Ford and either the mid-roof or the high-roof. If I were 20 years younger I'd probably go with the 40' truck.

Bottom line, you can't do too much research and studying before starting.
 
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GS1988

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Wish i could help, just getting started myself. leaning towards a Van. Was told i should start driving with a company that already has a fleet, as far as pay range, it seems to be a "VERY WIDE" variations in pay. Currently have my on-"S Corp" so I'll be speaking with my CPA and find out the best way to proceed tax wise. unfortunately, there's no A-Z on how it should be done. If you should find a decent insurance carrier, let me know,
Yeah that’s what I’ve heard as well. I’ve heard from people that are drivers or used to drive that progressive is who most people use. Plus I already have my car insurance through them so maybe I’ll get a bit of a discount. I appreciate the reply and I’ll share any useful info I come across.
 

GS1988

New Recruit
Owner/Operator
Offline
Well, before spending money on a vehicle get your degree in expediting just like you would in refrigeration or paralegal or mechanics or any other career. The fortunate thing is you can get your degree at no cost, other than time. Read back at least 5 years in the General, Newbies and Recruiter forums here. Not every word, but read every single thread title. When one sounds at all interesting or educational for you then read every word of those threads. Yes, it will take you several weeks but how long does it take to get a paralegal certificate or master plumber certificate?

Once you've read back at least 5 years you won't be ready but you will be well enough educated to know what you don't know and be able to ask questions to really get there.

Vehicles. The more you can safely and legally haul the more potential jobs you'll get. While driving a 40' straight truck my smallest load was basically a shoe box weighing about 4-5 pounds containing some super heavy duty circuit breaker to get a Tyson chicken processing plant going again so 200 employees weren't standing around. I also had a similar sized box, about 12-14 pounds, with some sort of fastener for the line at Caterpillar that should have been making road graders and similar oversize equipment. That one cost about $10k per minute of down time.

Yeah, a van could have taken either one but there wasn't a van available so I got them. The van sat and waited when I got the 4 skids with 9k pounds of Duracells and who knows what all other loads. My smallest load ever, after I switched to a van, was a legal envelope with a roughly 150 page contract, no more than a pound or so. So you never know what you may get but the more you can carry the more chances of getting something.

I switched from the 40' truck to a Chevrolet 1 ton van the last 3 years on the road for the convenience. I could go eat anywhere I wanted and find a place to park. I could park in my driveway when I came home. If I were going out again it would be in a van with a higher roof, probably a Ford and either the mid-roof or the high-roof. If I were 20 years younger I'd probably go with the 40' truck.

Bottom line, you can't do too much research and studying before starting.
Yes I couldn’t agree more. I’ve been thinking of doing this for some time now and I’ve just recently started my research. I work in manufacturing right now and I see hot shot guys, sprinters, straight trucks coming in more and more with the current material shortage that is going on. So that’s when I started thinking it’s a good time to get started and I’ve been trying to talk to as many of them as I can. I just joined this forum and it seems like there’s a lot of great information on here. I’m going to do like you suggested and continue my research until I feel confident enough. I really appreciate the response!
 
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TeamCaffee

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A theory is the less the cost of the vehicle the more common they are. A lot of companies will not put on more vans but are always begging for more straight trucks. When you are reading back through the forums a common thread is that it is hard to make a living in a solo van
 
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