Another Officer Down: No Outrage, No Riots...

Pilgrim

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...and no protests over this cold blooded murder of an officer trying to give somebody a break. "No good deed goes unpunished"; This quote has been attributed to Oscar Wilde and Claire Boothe Luce, and would certainly apply to the recent tragedy in KY when a rookie state trooper was shot and killed (by a BLM street thug from Ferguson, MO no less) during a routine traffic stop. For some reason, the officer was trying to arrange hotel accommodations for this animal and the other occupants of the car instead of arresting him for speeding and driving with a suspended license. After fleeing into the woods, the killer was found the next morning and shot dead - certainly a more appropriate ending for his miserable life that didn't matter.
"At the initial stop, it was his intent to put them all in a hotel without having to apprehend the driver," Thomas said. "It was a minor violation, having the driver's license suspended. After he initiated the pursuit, I'm sure his mind was changed on that."

The chase came to a screeching halt, however, when Johnson-Shanks abruptly stopped his vehicle causing Ponder to crash into him from behind, police said.

"At that point, the suspect leaned out of the driver-side window and fired multiple rounds at the trooper's car, striking the hood, the windshield and striking our trooper," Thomas said.

Kentucky State Police trooper killed in highway shooting
At this point, no statement from POTUS or his press secretary. If incidents like this continue without some decisive intervention from our national leadership, the racial divide in this country will expand to a point not seen since the 1950s. Decent, law-abiding citizens will not tolerate this kind of anarchy.
 
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muttly

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Possible the killer was worried about getting in trouble for this:
From the article:
.
Investigators started searching for Johnson-Shanks in May to question him about the suspected theft of lottery tickets, police said.
 

Turtle

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Calling him an "animal" and cherry picking "BLM street thug from Ferguson, MO" (he's from Florissant, not Ferguson) doesn't make you look racist at all.

It's more than a little odd that someone involved in the BLM movement, which advocates non-violence in protests, and being, you know, an "animal," who defended police shootings on his Facebook page, would react in such a manner when stopped by police and informed that a hotel would be arranged for him and his passengers. I guess we'll just have to take the police at their word as to what really happened.

The State Trooper pulled the vehicle over for speeding - 103 MPH. And his license was suspended. Therefore, hotel room. No one else in the vehicle has a drivers license, so the hotel room was probably for them, but I guarantee you Joseph Thomas Johnson-Shanks was about to be arrested, if not for the outstanding warrant in St Louis County, which would have been reported to the Trooper when he ran the license, then for the 26+ over the limit and being out of state, since 26+ over requires a hearing in front of a judge.

Not long before he was killed by the "Special Response Team" of the Kentucky State Police, Joseph Thomas Johnson-Shanks broadcast a Snapchap video where he said, "If I don’t see anybody anymore, I love all y’all. I did something I didn’t mean to. I’m gonna regret it.”

I'm still at a total loss at what we're supposed to be rioting, outraged or protesting about. Rioting occurs after an injustice, be it real or imagined. I don't see that here. It's outrageous when any law enforcement official dies in the line of duty, but that's an expected risk they take when signing on for the job, and it's a risk we are all aware of. Saddened by the unfortunate death, absolutely, but I don't think many people are going to get outraged over it (an extremely strong reaction of anger, shock, or indignation). And what are we supposed to protest? The goal of a protest is to achieve a particular objective. What would be the objective here? To eliminate bad guys? Bad cops? Speeding? Guns? Rural stretches of Interstates? Wooded areas?
 
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JohnWC

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No what is going on I cops being shot which is going to make outher cops get gun happy then there will be a real tragedy it's bad enough when one is around you need to keep you hands away from your body don't reach for anything till they ask you to etc
 

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Ever since there have been cops and guns, cops have been getting shot. It's a risk of which they are more than aware. It's among the reasons why the National Firearms Act of 1934 was signed into law.
 
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skyraider

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And the anger mounts again, nothing said about families, you just get bickering...
 

Turtle

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Tennessee Pride! Yum!
tennessee-pride-roll-sausage.jpg
 

LDB

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It's time for law enforcement to always have a partner present. It won't eliminate such situations but it should reduce their likelihood significantly. Penalties should be the maximum possible when guilt is absolute, with no plea bargains to reduce the penalty.
 
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cheri1122

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I don't believe law enforcement needs to be told how to do their jobs by civilians who don't have a clue. Police know how they are perceived, and if they don't know which of them are the problem [because it isn't all of them by a very long shot], there should be local civilians with enough awareness [politicians and clergy] to point it out to them, and enough juice to ensure they get the message.
As always, it's the bad apples who spoil it for the good ones. When they can stop defending the behavior of the abusers of authority, they stand a better chance of not being mistaken for one.
It's the same in any profession - including ours.
 
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LDB

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Yes, the bad officers need to be gone. Yes, they are a very small minority. That in no way excuses those who attack police officers and in no way suggests anything less than the most extreme punishment possible for those who do so.
 
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cheri1122

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It's largely because the good officers allowed it [and even helped cover it up] that the bad officers remain, and good officers are sometimes mistaken for them by bad actors. And even some who aren't bad - just terrified.
As far as punishment, that's not up to us to determine [and that's a good thing, IMO].
 
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Pilgrim

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Calling him an "animal" and cherry picking "BLM street thug from Ferguson, MO" (he's from Florissant, not Ferguson) doesn't make you look racist at all.
Play the race card if you choose and take all the personal cheap shots you want - it's worthless currency. It's been confirmed he was an activist in the Ferguson "protests" - riots, looting, whatever - and had a criminal record with an outstanding warrant for theft of lottery tickets as Muttly previously pointed out. He got pulled over for a minor traffic violation, and if Shanks had been shot by the trooper instead of the opposite happening there would be all kinds of h*ll being raised right now, and parallels being drawn to the Michael Brown incident.

http://www.stltoday.com/news/local/...cle_f4629c92-1769-557f-841d-2f8446c162cd.html
It's more than a little odd that someone involved in the BLM movement, which advocates non-violence in protests, and being, you know, an "animal," who defended police shootings on his Facebook page, would react in such a manner when stopped by police and informed that a hotel would be arranged for him and his passengers. I guess we'll just have to take the police at their word as to what really happened.
You're talking about BLM - the same ones chanting "Pigs in a blanket, fry 'em like bacon" at the MN state fair?
But I guess we will take the police at their word, considering the process officer Ponder was going through at the time is pretty well documented. You need to get over your problem with law enforcement officers and authority figures. This animosity toward LEOs is really a little odd unless maybe you had a bad experience with a speeding ticket or something similar.
The State Trooper pulled the vehicle over for speeding - 103 MPH. And his license was suspended. Therefore, hotel room. No one else in the vehicle has a drivers license, so the hotel room was probably for them, but I guarantee you Joseph Thomas Johnson-Shanks was about to be arrested, if not for the outstanding warrant in St Louis County, which would have been reported to the Trooper when he ran the license, then for the 26+ over the limit and being out of state, since 26+ over requires a hearing in front of a judge.
You can't guarantee anything of the sort. That's a gratuitous assertion based on prejudice and outright speculation with no basis in fact. Every report including one quoted in the OP stated that officer Ponder was in the process of arranging the hotel room for ALL of the occupants of the car and the minor traffic violation was getting a pass. He was arranging the hotel room so somebody with a legitimate license could come to drive them to their destination. I'll bet there won't be any more similar generosity from LEOs in the future.
Not long before he was killed by the "Special Response Team" of the Kentucky State Police, Joseph Thomas Johnson-Shanks broadcast a Snapchap video where he said, "If I don’t see anybody anymore, I love all y’all. I did something I didn’t mean to. I’m gonna regret it.”
Maybe he did regret it - who really knows what he was thinking when he was doing all this stupid stuff? Regardless, he was given every chance to surrender and didn't. You can't fix stupid. You can feel sympathetic for this guy if you want to - I don't. He was a cold-blooded killer and the color of his skin doesn't matter, and neither does that of the cop.
I'm still at a total loss at what we're supposed to be rioting, outraged or protesting about. Rioting occurs after an injustice, be it real or imagined. I don't see that here...
So you don't see the injustice or the outrage in the cold-blooded killing of this cop while he was trying to give this guy a break on a speeding ticket? Really??
 

Turtle

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Play the race card if you choose and take all the personal cheap shots you want - it's worthless currency.
I didn't play the race card, I made a simple, sarcastic observation. You had already played that card when you started the thread to lament the lack of outrage, riots and protests over a black man killing a white cop (as opposed to the norm of outrage, riots and protests that occur when a white cop kills a black man).

It's been confirmed he was an activist in the Ferguson "protests" - riots, looting, whatever - and had a criminal record with an outstanding warrant for theft of lottery tickets as Muttly previously pointed out.
Interestingly enough, none of that was confirmed in the article you linked. I read elsewhere where he participated in the protests, but I did not read where he took part in any riots, looting or whatever. Most of the people who participated in the protests did not engage in rioting, looting and whatever. Granted, I have steered clear of racist Blogs and other hot-button Blogs sites where the term "thug" is probably bandied about and they will make the criminal record and BLM and Ferguson the primary focus so as to associate Johnson-Shanks as closely as possible to them, to make him out to be as worthless a human being as possible, maybe even down to "animal" level, as I'd rather stick to actual facts rather than broad-brush painting, hastily drawn conclusions, unsubstantiated assumptions, and straight-up racial hatred. So I might have missed a few juicy tid bits. There are reports and pictures that show Joseph Thomas Johnson-Shanks participated in peaceful BlackLivesMatter protests, though, as well as several Facebook posts where he defended the police in several other shootings. He also attended Michael Brown's funeral, but then again so did a lot of people. I have not read anywhere that confirms he is a "BLM street thug" as you claim. Maybe I should try one of the Web sites I'm intentionally avoiding.

He got pulled over for a minor traffic violation,
He got pulled over for going 103 MPH in a 70 MPH zone. That's 26+ MPH over the speed limit and as such is denoted as a serious speeding traffic violation under Kentucky law (reckless driving). It is the only speeding offense you can get in Kentucky where the fine cannot be paid to the court clerk unless you have had a hearing in front of a judge. If you are from out of state the standard procedure for 26+ is to immediately suspend and confiscate the license, take you into custody, and present you to a judge. If it is after hours they will hold you in custody until the next court session or until they can contact a judge for a special hearing (which may happen right there over a speakerphone). To further complicate matters, 26+ with passengers in the vehicle is reckless endangerment, and with minor children in the vehicle it brings child endangerment into the picture. That's why I find it at the very least perplexing, and mostly a tad bit incredulous that Trooper Jay Thomas would state, "He was trying to help them out, and for an unknown reason, the driver fled. At the initial stop, it was his intent to put them all in a hotel without having to apprehend the driver. It was a minor violation, having the driver's license suspended." None of that makes any sense, other than trying to secure a hotel room for the passengers.

and if Shanks had been shot by the trooper instead of the opposite happening there would be all kinds of h*ll being raised right now, and parallels being drawn to the Michael Brown incident.
Yes, I know, I got that already from the thread title and it's continuation in the first line of the post.

You're talking about BLM - the same ones chanting "Pigs in a blanket, fry 'em like bacon" at the MN state fair?
No, not those ones. I don't paint with as wide a stereotype-brush as some. Not all Republicans speak with the same voice, nor do all Tea Partiers, or even all the members of the Boy Scouts of America. Occupy Wall Street splintered into a hundred different groups with different goals on about the third day. As well, not all supporters of the BLM movement share the same chants, goals and marching orders. Do you think all of the supporters of the BLM movement are exactly the same with the same thoughts, attitude and agenda?

But I guess we will take the police at their word, considering the process officer Ponder was going through at the time is pretty well documented.
Well documented based solely on statements from law enforcement officials.

You need to get over your problem with law enforcement officers and authority figures.
Why? I don't really have a problem in general with law enforcement officers and authority figures. The only ones I have a problem with are those who tells stories that don't add up, and those who lie to protect themselves and their own.

This animosity toward LEOs is really a little odd unless maybe you had a bad experience with a speeding ticket or something similar.
I don't have an animosity towards LEOs at all. I've learned over the last few years that they aren't any longer to be trusted at face value, though. I've actually never had an unpleasant or negative experience with a law enforcement officer (being routinely treated like a terrorist by US Border Patrol when coming back from Canada being the only exceptions, and even that wasn't all that bad).

You can't guarantee anything of the sort.
OK, you got me there, I'm not in a position to guarantee it. But I do know what the law in Kentucky says about it, and it mandates out-of-state offenders, in most cases, be presented to a judge before they can be released from custody. It also bumps driving on a suspended license from a relatively minor Class B Misdemeanor to a Class A Misdemeanor if a crime occurs (including serious speeding and serious moving violations), and if they were to charge endangerment and child endangerment, it's at a Class D felony, which in any case means it's no longer a ticket-and-pay-it situation, it's an arrest and charge situation.

That's a gratuitous assertion based on prejudice and outright speculation with no basis in fact.
Wrong on all counts.
Every report including one quoted in the OP stated that officer Ponder was in the process of arranging the hotel room for ALL of the occupants of the car and the minor traffic violation was getting a pass.
Yes, all of the journalists accurately quoted the officer and correctly reported what he said. I just find it a little odd that an officer would pull someone over for driving 103 MPH, find him in possession of a suspended license, and with an outstanding warrant for his arrest in Missouri (which Kentucky has a reciprocity agreement with), and decide to give him a pass on it all and instead arrange for a hotel room for him and the passengers. Don't you find that a little odd?

He was arranging the hotel room so somebody with a legitimate license could come to drive them to their destination.
Quite possibly, and certainly a logical conclusion, at least for the passengers, but I didn't see the reason mentioned in any of the reports, other than it was because no one in the vehicle had a valid driver's license.

I'll bet there won't be any more similar generosity from LEOs in the future.
I think there will be. It happens pretty often.

Maybe he did regret it - who really knows what he was thinking when he was doing all this stupid stuff? Regardless, he was given every chance to surrender and didn't. You can't fix stupid. You can feel sympathetic for this guy if you want to - I don't. He was a cold-blooded killer and the color of his skin doesn't matter, and neither does that of the cop.
What on Earth makes you think I might feel sympathy for this guy? I don't. By the same token I don't know that I'd go as far as saying that he was given every opportunity to surrender and didn't, because I haven't seen any video of that extravaganza. I only have the word of the police officers to take at face value.

So you don't see the injustice or the outrage in the cold-blooded killing of this cop while he was trying to give this guy a break on a speeding ticket? Really??
Well, for one, I don't know that it was a cold-blooded killing, as cold-blooded means without feeling and/or with cruel intent, purposefully ruthless, in a deliberate calculating manner. We have video evidence that contradicts that notion. And it didn't happen "while he was trying to give the guy a break on a speeding ticket," the guy fled, suddenly stopped, then leaned out the window and fired, which indicates panic more than anything. I don't see much of an injustice, certainly not an injustice worthy of a riot, as the shooter is dead and was punished for his injustice to Ponder. If the grand jury had failed to even indict him and just let him walk free without a trial, that would be an injustice. As for outrage, since there's no real injustice, and cops getting killed in the line of duty is an inherent risk of the job, I'm not shocked by it, and thus not outraged by it.
 
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RLENT

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So Allen West isn't a criminal thug?
I thought I heard he was from someone.
Any time you want to compare my comments about a specific individual - Allen West, a person of color - who was forced out of the armed forces for misconduct ... with the repeated generalized ranting, stereotyping (and to borrow the words of another poster) ... "broad-brush painting, hastily drawn conclusions, unsubstantiated assumptions" ... against broad swaths of those of color by a few here on EO, please feel free to do so ...
 

muttly

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Any time you want to compare my comments about a specific individual - Allen West, a person of color - who was forced out of the armed forces for misconduct ... with the repeated generalized ranting, stereotyping (and to borrow the words of another poster) ... "broad-brush painting, hastily drawn conclusions, unsubstantiated assumptions" ... against broad swaths of those of color by a few here on EO, please feel free to do so ...
A specific person who happens to be black, in Allen West. And a generalization of people in a particular region that were referred to as criminal thugs and sub huminoid Nazi thugs.
Pot calling the kettle black it appears by you. H to the Y to the POCRISY.
 
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