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2009 Hino 258 P2002

SunflowerTow

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Hello all - I have a 2009 Hino 258 that I bought used with about 250k miles on it. For the first 2 weeks that I’ve had it it’s ran very well, this is the first pre-DEF hino I’ve owned, I have 4 2011 and newer 258’s and like them very much.


3 days ago the driver of this one reported that the truck was making a whooshing noise and had a check engine light. I found the boost hose from the turbo to the CAC had come off of the turbo due to a broken clamp. I refitted it, and replaced the clamp. I hooked up DX2 to it and found P2002 and U1001. I figured that it must’ve had issues with the air intake measurement with the boost hose off and had a failed regen. So I cleared them and sent him on his way. Today he complained of the same noise again and when the truck was doing automatic regens, he complained of significant black smoke. This time the other hose clamp had broken on the same boost hose. I replaced it, and refitted the hose. There seems to be a significant amount of oil on this side of the CAC. I have not checked the cold side yet. Hooked DX2 up and had P2002 active with P0087, P0088, U1001, U0101, U0155 and P2002 all inactive. (I don’t get how 2002 can be both inactive and active but whatever Hino lol).


I switched the driver into a spare truck so I can work on this one on Tuesday. Any thoughts? After reading several of the posts on here I was gonna start with a PM and replace the air filter and fuel filters. The amount of oil in the boost hose also makes me want to check the turbo shaft for play. Any help is appreciated. Thank you!
 

SunflowerTow

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Update: So the P2002 code would not clear, and I could not start a forced regen with DX2. I had to clear all DPR values in order to force a regen. The motor seemed to stumble and miss while performing a forced regen, and the coolant temp rose to just below the overheat red area, and there was black sooty smoke coming from the DPF exhaust pipe. I stopped the forced regen when I saw the engine begin to overheat. The codes are cleared for now. I'm going to go around and clean and check grounds in case the U codes are causing issues, but I think I've got a mechanical issue here as well. Any advice is appreciated. Thanks!
 

greasytshirt

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You may have multiple issues, but it sounds like the exhaust brake setting is way off. Use DX2 to hold the engine at 980 rpm. Warm up the engine. Monitor injection quantity. It should be around 7-9. Turn on the exhaust brake. You are looking for a 12mm3 increase in injection quantity with the exhaust brake on. There are two adjusting bolts at the exhaust brake. Only adjust the one that the lever touches with the exhaust brake on. Leave the other one alone. Unscrew the adjuster to lower the number, screw it in to raise it. It sounds like it needs to be unscrewed.

The DPR in this truck is already damaged. Black smoke out of the tailpipe is the telltale.

The injectors in this engine are suspect. They are often the cause of DPR meltdown. If the exhaust brake adjustment is way too high, it's a sign that the injectors are overfueling.

Oil in the turbo piping is normal. If it's like tar, it can clog the CAC. Checking the turbo for binding should be on your list of things to do.

Make sure the ITV is in good shape, and modify it if it hasn't been done already. A modified ITV has three holes drilled in the throttle plate. If you do a search, you can find pictures of what this is supposed to look like.

Generally speaking, the U-codes on this era of truck can basically be ignored 99% of the time.

P0087 and P0088 set at the same time may be caused by the SCV (the fuel pressure regulator on the front of the injection pump), but you've got plenty of stuff to work on right now so we'll get back to that later.
 
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greasytshirt

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You're gonna need to take the rear housing off of the DPR and inspect it. The chances are good that the DPF has cracked, possibly chunks of it have blown out. This is a red flag for injector overfueling.
 
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SunflowerTow

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You may have multiple issues, but it sounds like the exhaust brake setting is way off. Use DX2 to hold the engine at 980 rpm. Warm up the engine. Monitor injection quantity. It should be around 7-9. Turn on the exhaust brake. You are looking for a 12mm3 increase in injection quantity with the exhaust brake on. There are two adjusting bolts at the exhaust brake. Only adjust the one that the lever touches with the exhaust brake on. Leave the other one alone. Unscrew the adjuster to lower the number, screw it in to raise it. It sounds like it needs to be unscrewed.


The DPR in this truck is already damaged. Black smoke out of the tailpipe is the telltale.


The injectors in this engine are suspect. They are often the cause of DPR meltdown. If the exhaust brake adjustment is way too high, it's a sign that the injectors are overfueling.


Oil in the turbo piping is normal. If it's like tar, it can clog the CAC. Checking the turbo for binding should be on your list of things to do.


Make sure the ITV is in good shape, and modify it if it hasn't been done already. A modified ITV has three holes drilled in the throttle plate. If you do a search, you can find pictures of what this is supposed to look like.


Generally speaking, the U-codes on this era of truck can basically be ignored 99% of the time.


P0087 and P0088 set at the same time may be caused by the SCV (the fuel pressure regulator on the front of the injection pump), but you've got plenty of stuff to work on right now so we'll get back to that later.

Awesome, thank you! I was wondering about the exhaust brake setting after reading a few of your other posts. I will adjust that in the morning, I’m glad I hit the adjuster screw with penetrating oil before I left the shop. I’ll get it in line and see


How do I check the injector contribution in DX2? I have a feeling that I’ll want to replace the whole set, but maybe once the exhaust brake is set right they might not be too far outta whack?


I’m gonna price a DPF tomorrow. The P0087 and 0088 haven’t set again since I cleared them the other day, I’m thinking they are isolated incidents. And copy that on the oil in the CAC piping.


Thank you for the help, I’ll let you know what happens tomorrow when I get back to the truck.
 

greasytshirt

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How do I check the injector contribution in DX2? I have a feeling that I’ll want to replace the whole set, but maybe once the exhaust brake is set right they might not be too far outta whack?
For a case of DPR meltdown, you'd want to replace the whole set. To evaluate the injectors on a 2008-2010 truck, an SCV test is performed. This is done using DX2. The really abbreviated version is to run the engine at 1500 rpm using activation test while monitoring injection quantity and rpm. The rpm should hold pretty close to 1500, but if it's fluctuating to around 1490-1510 or so, the injectors are bad. Also look at injection quantity. 8-9mm3 is good. When it drops into the 6 range, things are looking pretty grim.

You have already reset the DPR values so some information may have been lost. If you dig around in DX2 (I use DX2 with muscle memory at this point, so I can't recall where exactly to find this) you will find a recording of DPR inlet and outlet temps. It records the highest number, but doesn't have a timestamp. Outlet temps above 1400 or so indicate injector failure. The DPR starts to melt around 1450ish, from what I've been told. High inlet temps indicate an airflow problem, like turbo failure or ITV stick or a clogged CAC. After you replace the injectors, you want to reset this temperature history so you have a clean slate to monitor in the future.

So, this thing is a tow truck, right? Are you using the idle knob to raise the pto rpm? There's a much better way, and since you have DX2 you can do it yourself, provided you can wire up a relay. This goes for the rest of your Hino tow trucks, too. You can hit the pto button and have the engine immediately rev up to the optimum rpm. Are you interested?
 
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